Senior Year

A lot of my recent posts have been about how I’m a senior, and I’m finishing up my education and beginning to start my life.
It’s a really bittersweet place I, along with many other seniors, find myself in. I’m still involved with the things that have made my four years here so great. I’m still a member of Alpha Sigma Alpha, I’m still working with the paper, so on and so forth. But my relationship with these things is different.
I guess it’s sort of what happens in your senior year, in order to successfully transition from your life as a student to your life as an adult member of society.
I’ve found that I don’t fit into my roles nearly as tightly as I did before. I no longer serve ASA as a leader of the group, I’ll soon be training my replacement for the paper, and ultimately what has consumed the past four years of my life isn’t as strongly present.
It’s a really sad thing to think about, but it’s necessary. I’ll certainly miss all of the great things that I’ve built here–the relationships, my academic career, my work with the Black & Magenta, my influence in ASA–and there’s always going to be a part of me that’s sad to leave this beautiful part of my life behind. Yet I also have the honor of watching others begin to build these things for themselves. The new executive board of ASA has done incredible things in the time that they’ve held the position, and while I’m sad to be leaving behind something that I love, I know that I, along with my fellow exec members and seniors, have left the group with a legacy. We recruited more women than we’ve ever done in my time with ASA, and we provided them with that base of people to begin to mold and form ASA into what they want it to be. I’m incredibly proud of what we’ve done with the organization, and I have the utmost faith that under their leadership it will continue to grow and thrive. The same can be said for my role in the Black & Magenta. While it’s difficult to train someone to take on the role that you’ve held for years, it’s also a really rewarding experience. It’s nice to see that there is someone new and enthusiastic taking the position on and making it their own.
Ultimately, I imagine many seniors feel this way. It’s hard to turn over the reigns and watch as the things you’ve worked so hard for are in the care of someone else. But this constant change is what allows for the organizations we know and love to become so much stronger. I don’t know if I would have found such a fit to build my foundation in any other institution. What I do know is that Muskingum gave me a great start. It’s with that knowledge that I sit back and watch a new generation, so to speak, make their way into the ranks and start to make their own stories here. I may be sad to be leaving, but I’m incredibly happy to be a part of this “long magenta line.” I’m grateful to have a hand in running organizations and improving them so that they can become someone else’s foundation as well. And in that, my ending isn’t so much an end. Rather, it’s someone else’s beginning.

Kelsey

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